Minneapolis, Minnesota


Foreword

I was recently asked this question:

If you had to talk for an hour about something, what would it be?

My immediate thought was that the answer had to include a topic or subject I was an expert in. A trade, a craft, a technical way to do something, etc.  It wasn’t until a few replies in when I discovered that the root of my answers revolved around passion.  It’s easy to get passionate about a hobby.  Hobbies are everything that a job isn’t, right? They can be energetic, relaxing, exciting, inspiring, and motivating. However, hobbies take time. They take energy. When a hobby becomes a career, sometimes that passion gets lost in the distraction of day-to-day operations. I constantly hear people say, “Don’t make your hobby a job!” Why does that have to be the case? At what point does someone decide their hobby is essentially “ruined” by making it a job?

I believe the answer is not necessarily someone losing interest or passion, but rather that they are getting lost in the monotony of repetitive tasks that lack the creative and passionate elements they easily identified with as a hobby. It’s understandable, considering the amount of physical and mental energy required to keep up with a job. My trick in keeping my hobby & passion a job has always been to find moments of the day to discover and tinker with some of the amazing new trends or tricks of the trade. There are so many things to get passionate about—especially with technology!

With that said, if I had to talk for an hour about something, it would be about all of the technology that excites and motivates me to always keep advancing my understanding of where we are going.

  • How inspiring it is that programming languages, hardware, and associated lesson plans are now accessible to anyone who wants to jump into a new career to contribute or influence the way things are done.
  • How that a computer now costs less than a cup of coffee and that high speed Internet can be deployed to remote villages for less than the cost of an espresso machine.
  • How the Internet of Things (IoT) is growing every day and gathering intelligent data to improve on the processes of almost everything do.
  • How computers and the electronics we use now consume a fraction of the energy they did only a few years ago.
  • How in the next ten years our consumer behavior will change in many ways we currently can’t predict every time a software developer identifies a faster or more innovative way to interact with customers.

I welcome you to browse my website! Occasionally I will publish a Workshop article that hopefully outlines a new way of thinking about or using technology.  If you’re in IT (networking, software, architecture, etc) and wish to talk with me about some of the awesome things you are doing or have learned, drop me a line. I would love to chat! If you’re not in IT, the invitation is, of course, still enthusiastically open! I love hearing about what drives or makes someone passionate in their field.

Garrett Guntly